Start Army dating in same unit

Army dating in same unit

Most divisions reached their full complement of officers, but had less than 100 enlisted men, since there was no incentive for them to serve.

While many National Guard units owned their own armories, some dating back to the nineteenth century, the Organized Reserve Corps had no facilities for storing equipment and for training.

Although the War Department requested funds for needed facilities, Congress moved slowly in response.

The plan the army commanders received called for twenty-five Organized Reserve Corps divisions, but the divisions activated between September 1946 and November 1947 differed somewhat from the original plans.

The First United States Army declined to support an airborne division, and the 98th Infantry Division replaced the 98th Airborne Division.

Units in other arms of the Army besides infantry, most notably cavalry, field artillery and engineers were also formed.

Organized Reserve units, depending upon their geographic area, maintained relationships with one or several colleges or universities, which populated them with officers through the Reserve Officers' Training Corps.

Thus the final tally of divisions formed after World War II appears to have been the 19th, 21st, and 22d Armored Divisions; the 80th, 84th, 100th and 108th Airborne Divisions; and the 76th, 77th, 79th, 81st, 83d, 85th, 87th, 89th, 98th, 90th, 91st, 94th, 95th, 96th, 97th, 102nd, 103rd, and 104th Infantry Divisions.