Start Dating your mom ian frazier excerpt

Dating your mom ian frazier excerpt

Here you will find large insights (Woody Allen: “Why does man kill? And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage”) and hard-earned wisdom (Ian Frazier on dating your mom: “Here is a grown, experienced, loving woman—one you do not have to go to a party or a singles bar to meet, one you do not have to go to great lengths to know”). (Enough have been published, Robert Benchley maintains, “that there should be no danger of toppling over forward into the wrong soup, or getting into arguments as to which elbow belongs on which arm.”) Other pieces offer perspectives on the heights of fame, the depths of social embarrassment, and the ups and downs of love and sex. A wonderful gift for others, or a delightful treat for oneself, Fierce Pajamas is a treasury of laughter from a publication described by Auden as “the best comic magazine in existence.”From the Hardcover edition.

Fierce Pajamas is a treasury of laughter from the magazine W. Auden called the “best comic magazine in existence.” When Harold Ross founded The New Yorker in 1925, he described it as a “comic weekly.” And although it has become much more than that, it has remained true in its irreverent heart to the founder’s description, publishing the most illustrious literary humorists of the modern era—among them Robert Benchley, Dorothy Parker, Groucho Marx, George S. This anthology gathers together, for the first time, the funniest work of more than seventy New Yorker contributors.

Parodists take on not only writers like Hemingway and Kerouac, but TV documentaries, Italian cinema, and etiquette books. Perelman, Peter De Vries, Mike Nichols, Marshall Brickman, Woody Allen, Donald Barthelme, Calvin Trillin, George W. Trow, Veronica Geng, Garrison Keillor, Ian Frazier, Roy Blount, Jr., Bruce Mc Call, Steve Martin, Christopher Buckley, and Paul Rudnick.

One night in ‘39, I was playing alto with Mc Shann’s band uptown at the old Savoy Ballroom—mostly blues, ’cause we had one of the better blues shouters of the day, Walter Brown—and Dizzy Gillespie was sittin’ out front.

So after the set Diz comes up to me and he says, "Sailcat, I got this chick that you just got to hear.

After hours, they used to sit around and jam and trade aphorisms. They asked me and Diz to join, but Diz was supposed to go on tour with Billy Eckstine’s band, and as for me, well, I wasn’t too crazy about the group’s strong Hellenic leanings. Being a member of the Bloomsbury Group has brought me out of myself and taught me how to open up to other people.

Me and Cootie Williams and Duncan Grant and Billie Holiday and Leonard Woolf, who later married Ginny, and Ella Fitzgerald, who had just taken over Chick Webb’s band, and James (Lytton’s brother) and Dizzy and the Duke and Maynard Keynes and Satchmo and Charles Mingus and Theodore Llewelyn Davies and Thelonious Monk and Charles Tennyson and Miles Davis and Ray Charles and Hilton Young (later Lord Kennet) all used to sit in sometimes too. At the beginning, all of us—Leonard, Clive, Vanessa, Lytton, Duncan, Maynard, and me —we were like different states of mind in one consciousness.

A few critics have complained that the Bloomsbury Group relies too heavily on studio effects; this album will instantly put such objections to rest.