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Hardcore guitarists use some approaches that are similar to their thrash counterparts: "..high output pickups", "lots of upper midrange", "a full, bass-heavy" tone and the use of both guitar amp distortion and a "Tube Screamer or similar overdrive pedal", but without speaker distortion.

Numerous hardcore punk bands have taken far left political stances such as anarchism or other varieties of socialism and in the 1980s expressed opposition to political leaders such as then US president Ronald Reagan and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher.

The pejorative term "poseur" is applied to those who associate with punk and adopt its stylistic attributes but are deemed not to share or understand the underlying values and philosophy. Critic Steven Blush writes "The Sex Pistols were still rock'n'roll..the craziest version of Chuck Berry. It's its own form." The impact of powerful volume is important in hardcore.

Noisey magazine describes one hardcore band as "..all-encompassing, full-volume assault" in which "...[e]very instrument sounds like it's competing for the most power and highest volume." Scott Wilson states that the hardcore of the Bad Brains emphasized two elements: "off-the-charts" loudness which reached a level of threatening, powerful "uncompromising noise" and rhythm, in place of the typically focused-on elements in mainstream rock music, harmony and pitch (i.e., melody).

Reagan's economic policies, sometimes dubbed "Reaganomics", and social conservatism were common subjects for criticism by hardcore bands of the time.

Certain hardcore punk bands have conveyed messages sometimes deemed "politically incorrect" by placing offensive content in their lyrics and relying on stage antics to shock listeners and people in their audience. U.'s generated controversy with their 1983 album, "My America", whose lyrics contained what appeared to be conservative and patriotic views.

Konstantin Butz states that while the origin of the expression "hardcore" "...cannot be ascribed to a specific place or time", the term is "...usually associated with the further evolution of California's L. Punk Rock scene", which included young skateboarders.

A September 1981 article by Tim Sommer shows the author applying the term to the "15 or so" punk bands gigging around the city at that time, which he considered a belated development relative to Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington D. Kelefa Sanneh states that the term "hardcore" referred to an attitude of "turning inwards" towards the scene and "ignoring broader society", all with the goal of achieving a sense of "shared purpose" and being part of a community.

Music writer Barney Hoskyns compared punk rock with hardcore and stated that hardcore was "younger, faster and angrier, full of the pent up rage of dysfunctional Orange County [(Los Angeles)] adolescents" who were sick of their life in a "bland Republican" area., there are notable exceptions, such as the all-African-American band Bad Brains and notable women such as Crass singer Joy de Vivre and Black Flag's second bassist, Kira Roessler. said in an interview: "For every person sporting an anarchy symbol without understanding it there’s an older punk who thinks they’re a poseur." In the vein of earlier punk rock, most hardcore punk bands have followed the traditional singer/guitar/bass/drum format.