Start Radiocarbon dating how stuff works

Radiocarbon dating how stuff works

Historians don't have "right answers" for really old things.

For example, Stonehenge suddenly became older than the Pyramids, instead of younger.

Since then, several other calibrations have been done, which confirm and extend the tree-ring one.

If you hear of a living tree being dated as a thousand years old, that is not necessarily an example of an incorrect dating. Wood taken from the innermost ring really is as old as the tree. We can date things for which historians know a "right answer".

And, we can date things that have been dated by some other method.

That causes a dating problem with any animal that eats seafood. After about ten half-lives, there's very little C14 left.

So, anything more than about 50,000 years old probably can't be dated at all.

On the Web, you could visit a dating laboratory, visit a dating service, read an encyclopedia entry or read a critique.

The Lake Suigetsu varve calibration was reported by ABC News and was published: Atmospheric Radiocarbon Calibration to 45,000 yr B.

It is also standard to coat fossils during their extraction and transport.

Acetone is sometimes used while extracting fossils, because it dissolves dirt.

See below for details about the 45,000 annual varves in Lake Suigetsu. For example, polar bears that eat seals aren't getting their carbon from an atmospheric source.